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10%SEPTWEEKS
10%AUGBREAKS
PAYINFULL
COUPLE50
2WK150XTRA
10%2WKS
5%OCTNOV
100WKSAT
URBAN200
Copyright Foxhangers Canal Holidays 2014
Boating
The Kennet & Avon Canal exists only because of the commercial need for improved transport as the Agricultural Age moved into the Industrial Age. Navigation is the fundamental use of the waterway and today this is represented largely by leisure boating. Narrowboats are now the dominant type of craft using the waterway but as a broad waterway a variety of wide boats can also be met with. Approximately 1500 boats are based on the Kennet & Avon Canal and these include about 80 hire boats, passenger trip boats and hotel boats. A considerable number of boats visit the canal from other parts of the inland waterway network each year. Most visitors will enter from the River Thames at Reading.
Cycling
Cycling is a permitted use for most of the length of the towpath. The Local Authorities fund Canal & River Trust for towpath access for all.

Contact the Canal and River Trust in Devizes (01380 722859) for the up-to-date position.
The towpath surface has been improved for cycling by funding through Sustrans  - www.sustrans.org.uk

The section from Reading to Bath is part of the National Cycling Route No. 4 from London to St Davids and for the
most part uses the Kennet & Avon Canal towpath.
Walking
The Kennet & Avon Canal towpath provides a continuous Public Right of Way from Reading to Bristol. Continuing improvements to the towpath seek to provide a wide, safe and accessible surface and trouble-free walking conditions. From Reading to Great Bedwyn the local railway service provides good access to many parts of the canal. Details of the services can be obtained from www.thames-trains.co.uk.
Rail access returns between Trowbridge, Bradford on Avon, Bath and Bristol with services provided by Wales & West www.walesandwest.co.uk

Bus services with access to the canal between Reading and Newbury are provided by Reading Buses
www.reading-buses.co.uk. Wiltshire Bus provides services in the central area  with the ‘Wigglybus’ service providing access to several of the more remote villages in the Vale of Pewsey.
BadgerLine www.firstbadgerline.co.uk  serves the West Wiltshire, Bath and Bristol areas.

Other useful contacts:

TRAVELINE on 0870 608 2 608

NATIONAL RAIL ENQUIRIES on 08457 48 49 50

Timetable leaflets, booklets and maps for public transport services in Wiltshire can be obtained by ringing Wiltshire County Council on 01225 713000 or by emailing buses@wiltshire.gov.uk
Angling
Cycling is a permitted use for most of the length of the towpath. Currently an individual Cycle Pass is required but
shortly the Local Authorities will fund general access for all.

Contact the Canal and River Trust in Devizes (01380 722859) for the up-to-date position.
The towpath surface has been improved for cycling by funding through Sustrans  - www.sustrans.org.uk

The section from Reading to Bath is part of the National Cycling Route No. 4 from London to St Davids and for the
most part uses the Kennet & Avon Canal towpath.
Canoeing
The Kennet & Avon Canal is home to what has become one of the major long-distance international canoeing races - The Devizes to Westminster Canoe Race. This 125-mile race is held over the Easter Weekend. Senior classes cover the route non-stop whilst Juniors stop overnight in Newbury and Marlow. Visit www.dwrace.org.uk for information about the race’s history, rules and entry details.
Other races based in Newbury www.watersides.fsnet.co.uk and Reading act as a forerunner to this major event. Information about canoeing in general can be found at www.bcu.org.uk

In addition to competitive canoeing the canal provides excellent water for cruising by kayak or Canadian canoe. BCU membership includes a British Waterways’ permit for canoeing
Bird Watching
Recent surveys have identified up to 103 different species of bird over the length of the canal. Of these 38 could
be classified as specialist waterway birds with 14 species confirmed as breeding. Sand Martins nest in the drain-
pipes set in the brick walls of the canal in the centre of Reading.

The relatively rare Reed Bunting (left) is found in many parts of the canal. Wilton Water and the Kennet Valley
gravel pits provide significant habitats for breeding and wintering waterfowl. The Red Kite has also been seen in
the Great Bedwyn area as it extends its range over the Downs from its base in the Chilterns.
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Angling on the Kennet & Avon Canal pdf